Global Pop Cultures Journal

Kyoto
Hong Kong, Singapore, Taipei
London
Zurich
Issue 0, March 20201
Self-Imaging: Identity, Disruption, Transformation.
Editors: Joseph Imorde, Jörg Scheller, Judith Mair, Masahiro Yasuda, Daniel Späti, Takuro Mizuta, Richard Reynolds

Welcome everybody,

this is the "Edition Zero" of the Global Pop Cultures Journal, edited by Shared Campus Publications. The first issue of the online Journal will be published in 2022 – as a foretaste of what is to come, we gladly present the proceedings of our online lecture series "Self-Imaging: Identity, Disruption, Transformation", organized by the Shared Campus’ theme group Pop Cultures. The video lectures, interviews, talks and discussions were shown on shared-campus.com from October through December 2020. Whereas the Global Pop Cultures Journal will contain a peer-reviewed section, the following contributions are non-peer reviewed, experimental, multi-faceted and wild.

Welcome everybody,

this is the "Edition Zero" of the Global Pop Cultures Journal, edited by Shared Campus Publications. The first issue of the online Journal will be published in 2022 – as a foretaste of what is to come, we gladly present the proceedings of our online lecture series "Self-Imaging: Identity, Disruption, Transformation", organized by the Shared Campus' theme group Pop Cultures. The video lectures, interviews, talks and discussions were shown on shared-campus.com from October through December 2020. Whereas the Global Pop Cultures Journal will contain a peer-reviewed section, the following contributions are non-peer reviewed, experimental, multi-faceted and wild.

"Self-Imaging: Identity, Disruption, Transformation" revolves around the self in times of accelerated globalization, technology-driven hybridization and digital connectivity. The self, which in fact has never been self-evident, appears less self-evident than ever before. Accordingly, we experience a plethora of discourses, debates, cultural, social, political, and commercial practices revolving around the notion of “the self”.

From selfies to drag, superheroes to villainous politicians and beyond, never have issues around the creative engagement with self-image, disruptions of personal identity and liquid bodily configurations been so pressing, so public. Our global playground is a place where Instagram pictures lie and rhythms from various heritage cultures mash-up with technological modes to create utterly contemporary cultural forms. The self, and its mediation through the various platforms for imaging, sounding, speaking or feeling, is an important but by no means uncontested construct. In fact, it can be considered as a productive paradox. Caught between the quest for unmistakable individuality and ever evolving social obligations in transcultural contexts, it oscillates between obstinacy and adaptation. The search for sameness in diversity plays a central role in both scientific and creative discourse. The authentic self is marketed as an ideal and aspirational image, demanding a high convergence of subjective “inside” and social “outside.” But increasingly half-baked, fickle, and ambiguous identity concepts are disrupting the modernist ideal of “being whole within oneself.” Pop cultures offer an ideal breeding ground for this.

With that said, we have asked international scholars and artists to provide insights into their research about “self-imaging” in various fields of pop global cultures. In six sections, our presenters will shed light on “Designing the Self”, “Creative Identities across Art and Science”, Staging the Self”, “Picturing the Self”, “Hearing the Self”, and “Writing the Self”.

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